CSO statistics point to 'vulnerable' young driver group in Longford

Adam Cox

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Adam Cox

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newsroom@longfordleader.ie

CSO statistics point to 'vulnerable' young driver group in Longford

CSO statistics point to 'vulnerable' young driver group in Longford

An Irish telematics expert, who has a devised a new App that will let parents monitor their children’s driving behaviour on the roads, has said that new CSO figures point to the fact that Ireland’s young drivers are amongst the most vulnerable on the road.

Greg McGarry, who launched Targify the driver safety App earlier this year, was commenting on the back of the CSO’s release of the Transport Omnibus report for 2017[1],

“In 2016, of drivers between the ages of 18 – 24, there were

272 men injured in road collisions
186 women injured in road collisions
13 men killed in road fatalities
There were 2 road fatalities in 2017 – down from 3 in 2016, as well as 112 injuries on Longford’s roads in 2016. Everyone is affected by dangerous or risky driving behaviour – but as inexperienced and sometimes overenthusiastic new drivers, we all need to be mindful of how young drivers behave on our roads. While there are many sensible young drivers out there, there can be no denying that a certain cohort can behave recklessly at times, and we need to tackle this issue, so that we can improve road safety for everyone.

The parents of these young drivers certainly have a role to play – but they can only do so much. Ultimately, we need to instil a sense of caution and safety from an early age. Promoting good behaviour on our roads and shunning speedy and risky driving is important – so that it’s not seen as “cool” to drive to fast or recklessly – but that it is, in fact, regarded as dangerous and foolish.”

The experts at Targify say the CSO report reveals some interesting findings which give some indication as to the most perilous times on Irish roads – in 2017 -

There were more fatalities in March (20) than any other month of the year, a change from July (21) the previous year
April had the least fatalities (7) – compared with November (9) in 2016
Friday appears to be the most dangerous day for driving with the most collisions and casualties happening on this day
More collisions happened at 5pm than at any other time of day
Mr. McGarry went on to say,

“The CSO statistics allow us to make some observations around which times/ days/ months have been the most dangerous, and although they should not mean we should drive more safely at one time or another, perhaps being aware and more cognisant of them would promote safer driving overall. If parents can perhaps draw their children’s attention to these figures it might, in fact, give them food for thought and perhaps encourage greater consideration of the way they use the roads.”