Dog owners in Longford called on to show greater responsibility, after spate of livestock attacks

Kevin Forde

Reporter:

Kevin Forde

Email:

kevin.forde@longfordleader.ie

File Photo

File Photo

Dog owners in Longford have been warned to be more responsible with their pets, after Longford dog control services highlighted a number of incidents over the weekend where dogs were wreaking havoc in the Colehill area of the county.

The dogs in question, pit bull crossbreeds, were caught chasing and attacking livestock on Saturday, September 28.
During one of the attacks carried out by the dogs, one weanling was badly injured and suffered extensive injuries to it’s ears and hindquarters. This animal, as a result of the injuries suffered, had to be put down.

Another attack occurred on Saturday evening, September 28, and saw the dogs again attack a weanling.

Also read: Calls for greater dog control after livestock attacked in Longford

Hillary Robinson, Dog Warden in Longford, told the Leader that these attacks were the first ones reported by the farmer, after first attempting to rectify the situation with the dog owner. Upon the owners refusal to take action, the dogs were subsequently reported to authorities, though the attacks continued.

Hillary described the scene on Saturday as horrific and something one hopes to never witness, with one of the weanling’s ears having been pulled clean off. She said incidents like these leave no winners.

She said: “There are no winners from a situation like this, not the farmers or dog owner.

“The man in question also loved his dogs. They were his pets.”

During the final attack carried out by the dogs on Saturday, the farmer unsuccessfully tried to free his weanling from the grasp of one of the dogs. Unable to do so, authorities were left with no alternative but to shoot it. The other dog was then humanely put to sleep after the attacks. The second weanling suffered extensive injuries and it is unsure if it will survive.

WARNING: Below image is graphic in nature

Hillary Robinson described the scene as nothing she had ever seen before in her career. She then urged all dog owners to show greater responsibility for their pets, before noting her fear ahead of lambing season and warning that the situation could have been a lot worse.

She said: “I dread to think what would have happened if these dogs have encountered a man, woman or child.”

In conclusion, Hillary urged all dog owners to take better control of their animals to avoid instances such as this, while also urging them to always microchip their dogs and pay their licence fees, noting the importance of licence fees to tackling many dog-related issues in the area.

“If you love your dog, chip your dog.”she said.

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