National award for Longford Revamp 3R store

National award for Longford Revamp 3R store

Revamp 3R Store received the Pakman Award for ‘Community Recycling Project of the Year 2016’ at a ceremony in Dublin recently. 

Leading the congratulations at the ceremony was Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment Mr Denis Naughten.

The Pakman Award seeks to recognise complete excellence in environmental approach in all aspects of their operations. 400 representatives from leading businesses, organisation and community groups came together to recognise excellence in recycling, energy and waste management.

Marcella O’Connor, a long-serving member of the 3R staff, said, “While we did not win the overall award, we were thrilled to win an award in our section, especially a national title. 

“Revamp 3R, which was launched in 2005 has made steady progress over the years, can now offer a wide range of services,” she added.

Two other members of staff, Mary McGarry and Bridget Whittin, gave praise to all the community for all its support over the years with all their donations and goodwill towards the project. 

Revamp is a non-profit venture which supports training and job opportunities for unemployed young people.

The project offers a wide range of second-hand furniture for sale and also runs a furniture repair service. 

Stephen O’Leary a member of the restoration unit at the 3R, said he was delighted with the range the store can offer. “For example, a simple thing as a set of kitchen chairs has one broken leg; we can repair that so the set is back complete again. Not too many businesses will do this type of repair because there is no big profit in it.”

Revamp 3R are diverting over 40,000kg yearly from landfill, thus making a significant contribution to the local authority's  landfill targets. They also support many financially hard pressed community groups who may be in need of furniture and have very little funds to purchase it. 

Marcella concluded, “Many of the Drama groups in the county and surrounding areas often borrow furniture to use as props in their productions.”