Longford Leader columnist Mattie Fox: Ireland will be a better place when this Covid-19 crisis is over

Mattie Fox

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Mattie Fox

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newsroom@longfordleader.ie

As Woody Allen said, some years ago, “If you want to give God a good laugh, start telling him your plans for the future.”
That’s not the precise wording, but close enough.

Virtually every self appointed authority talking on radio, TV, or social media, very precise, rational sounding opinion, backed up by what are presented as facts, about eventual ‘recovery’ after the current catastrophe has passed.

Paper never refused ink, TV much the same.

That’s what passes for journalism nowadays.

Maybe it was always so, I cannot say whether or not that’s the case.

Some commentators are predicting we’ll see a cure shortly.

Nobody really knows.

It could take maybe two years. It could take even more.

We need to be cautious about how we relate to each other, and the importance of the simple habit of washing your hands, before going out, and again before coming back in, should remain - I expect - for the foreseeable future.

Certainly for the remainder of this year, 2020.

Hearing economists predict the outcome of the virus is amusing. These are some of the same people who never saw the crash of 2008, until it was right upon us.

Yet in rural Ireland now, an air of normality still lives on.

Obviously there aren’t as many cars whizzing past, and none as early in the morning. But overall everyone is getting things done, quietly and diligently, without any great fuss.

Our local pitch was forced to close, unfortunately. I’m sure it was because of a bunch of misguided individuals who spent several days drinking and being reckless in cars.

Those who were involved know who they are - as do most of the local population. They should have a think about what they caused by behaving so badly.

I do believe Ireland will be a better place when all this is over.

Nurses and doctors might even get money they deserve, for a change; maybe more beds will be “opened” (what an insulting use of language) to be ready for unforeseen circumstances.

Maybe this should mean those waiting years for basic surgery will get it in proper, timely fashion.

Maybe the hospitals will become cleaner environments, thereby practicing what is actually expected of our hospitals.

Maybe the hospitals will get more staff.

Maybe ambulance services will get an injection, so they can arrive on time to every call.

Maybe, maybe, maybe the health service will look different?

Maybe.