Longford District Court: Broke into three cars in Abbeycartron

Defendant was intoxicated at the time

Longford Leader

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A man who appeared before Longford District Court last week charged under the Theft and Fraud Offences Act was convicted and fined €600 following a hearing into the matter.

Calum Meade (19), 9 Tromra Road, Granard, Co Longford appeared before Judge Seamus Hughes charged with stealing a quantity of CDs at Abbeycartron, Longford on dates between June 21 and June 22, 2014.

He was also further charged with two counts of interfering with a car belonging to a second person on the same date.

Outlining the evidence to the court, Garda Paul Connolly said that on the dates in question between the hours of 10pm and 9am, a number of parked cars in the Abbeycartron area of Longford town were broken into.

The court heard that a number of CDs valued at €80 were taken from one car in the incident, while two other vehicles were searched.

“Fingerprints were taken from the vehicle's, analyzed and subsequently matched with the defendant,” Garda Connolly continued.

In mitigation, the defendant’s solicitor Frank Gearty said his client was anxious that a custodial sentence not be imposed by the court on this occasion.

“Mr Meade was intoxicated at the time,” added Mr Gearty.

“Since then, he has seen the inside of a prison and it has made an impact on him I can tell you.

“He was a child then but is now an adult.”

Mr Gearty then said that his client had moved on with his life and was now residing in Granard and had “settled down” somewhat.

“He is now residing in Granard and keeping a low profile; in recent months he has become engaged and has settled down.”

Meanwhile, addressing Judge Hughes directly, the defendant said he had applied for a Tús Scheme.

He also pointed out to the court that he was also endeavouring to gain access to an anger management course.

“I am also hoping to get work at Pat the Bakers,” he added, before indicating to the court that he was in fact dyslexic.

“Factory work would suit me.”

Following his deliberations on the matter, Judge Hughes convicted the defendant and fined him €200 on each charge before him.