Latest CSO figures put Longford as one of five counties to report less than ten new Covid-19 cases in ten weeks

No Covid-19 deaths reported in Longford since early June

Jessica Thompson

Reporter:

Jessica Thompson

Email:

jessica.thompson@longfordleader.ie

Latest CSO figures put Longford as one of five counties to report less than ten new Covid-19 cases in ten weeks

Longford is one of five counties to report less than ten new cases of Covid-19 in the space of ten weeks, according to CSO figures which were released this morning.

The county has not seen a major outbreak since the beginning of May, when over 100 cases were confirmed following an outbreak at a meat factory in the Ballymahon area.

There have also been no Covid-19 deaths confirmed in Longford since the week ending June 5, according to the latest figures from the Central Statistics Office. In that week ending June 5, less than five deaths were reported.

The figures, which recorded the number of cases of coronavirus, as well as the number of deaths, between the February 28 and July 17, revealed that the number of people who have died from Covid-19 has been below 10 for the last three weeks.

The figures do not include the nine deaths which were reported yesterday, bringing Ireland's death toll to 1,763.

Read also: Longford's Covid-19 total increases to 287 confirmed cases

Yesterday also saw seven new cases of Covid-19 confirmed, bringing the national total to 25,826. Longford's total number of cases currently stands at 287, with no new cases reported since July 6, when one case was confirmed.

This morning's CSO figures have revealed that:

  • Dublin continues to be the county worst hit by Covid-19, accounting for 51% of total confirmed deaths
  • The number of weekly confirmed Covid-19 cases exceeds 100 cases in each of the last two weeks up to the week ending July 17
  • There were 103 confirmed Covid-19 cases in the week ending July 17, a decrease of 38 cases from the previous week
  • The median age of new confirmed Covid-19 cases was 35 years old for the week ending July 17
  • The week ending up to and including July 17 was the seventh week in a row that Dublin had less than 100 weekly cases since the start of March
  • This is the fifth week in a row that Clare and Offaly recorded no new cases
  • This is the ninth week in a row that Mayo, Westmeath and Wicklow have recorded less than 10 new cases
  • This is the tenth week in a row that Clare, Leitrim, Longford, Tipperary and Wexford have recorded less than 10 new cases
  • This is the eleventh week in a row that Donegal, Kerry and Laois have recorded less than 10 new cases and the twelfth such week for Waterford
  • Women and those aged between 25-44 continue to account for the highest number of confirmed cases
  • Just over half (52%) of confirmed cases are now linked to an outbreak
  • More than 40% of cases related to an outbreak in the last four weeks were linked to travel with five cases related to restaurants and cafés noted for the first time in July

This is the eighth publication in a series of information bulletins produced by the Central Statistics Office (CSO), that aim to provide insights into those who have either died of, or contracted, Covid-19, by using data from the Computerised Infectious Disease Reporting (CIDR) provided to the CSO by the Health Protection Surveillance Centre.

Read also: Latest update on Covid-19 confirmed cases and deaths in Ireland

This week’s bulletin includes an analysis of the Mortality, Hospitalisation and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission rates (per 1,000 confirmed cases) by month since March.

The overall mortality rate is 58 per 1,000 confirmed cases, this was highest in April at 73 per 1,000 confirmed cases but fell to a consistent level of 34 and 36 in May and June.

The overall hospitalisation rate is 151 per 1,000 confirmed cases, this was highest in March at 182 per 1,000 confirmed case and has fallen to 78 in July.

The overall ICU admission rate is 17 per 1,000 confirmed cases, this was also highest in March at 27 per 1,000 confirmed cases and has been below 12 from April to July. It is important to note that there is a time lag between onset of symptoms and hospital admission or death.

Deaths

The data produced by the CSO is based on the Actual Date of Death. Using this method, the CSO has found that while the number of people who have died from Covid-19 is below 10 for the last three weeks, Dublin remains the hardest hit.

The total number of people who have died from Covid-19 is 1,497, with a further 256 deaths cited as probable deaths linked to the virus. For the week ending July 17, less than five deaths were recorded.

The virus claimed the lives of 27 more men than women up to and including the week ending July 17. It also continues to impact the older age groups the hardest, with 65% of all confirmed Covid-19 deaths to date in the 80 years or older age group.

Confirmed Cases

The number of weekly confirmed Covid-19 cases is more than 100 in each of the last two weeks up to and including July 17.

The total number of confirmed cases is 25,750. The number of cases for the week ending July 17 is 103, a decrease of 38 from the previous week.

More than half (52%) of all confirmed cases are now linked to an outbreak.

While 3,682 more females were diagnosed with Covid-19 than males, the median age remains consistent for both men and women.

The 25-44 age group still show the highest number of confirmed Covid-19 cases at 8,880.

Health care workers continue to make up almost a third of all cases.

The median age of new confirmed Covid-19 cases was 35 years old for the week ending July 17. This is the fourth week in a row where the median age of new cases has been under 40.

Read also: Gardaí enforce Covid-19 regulations in pubs on 20 occasions

The week ending up to and including July 17 was the seventh week in a row that Dublin had less than 100 weekly cases since the start of March. There were 64 new cases diagnosed in Dublin in the week ending July 17, down from the peak of 1,864 cases in the week ending 27 March. Kildare was the only other county to record 10 or more new cases in the past three weeks up to the week ended July 17.

  • This is the fifth week in a row that Clare and Offaly recorded no new cases.
  • This is the ninth week in a row that Mayo, Westmeath and Wicklow have recorded less than 10 new cases.
  • This is the tenth week in a row that Clare, Leitrim, Longford, Tipperary and Wexford have recorded less than 10 new cases.
  • This is the eleventh week in a row that Donegal, Kerry and Laois have recorded less than 10 new cases and the twelfth such week for Waterford.

Hospitalisations

Last week, the week ending July 17, nine people were hospitalised, down from 652 people at the peak, the week ending 27 March. For the eighth week in a row there have been less than five people admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). These figures may need to be adjusted if someone’s condition worsens as there is a time lag between onset of symptoms and hospitalisation.

Underlying Conditions

There have been 1,419 deaths of people with underlying conditions from 10,030 confirmed cases with underlying conditions. The median age of those dying with underlying conditions is 83. Of these 1,419 deaths, 757 had one underlying condition while 662 had two or more underlying conditions.

There were 1,319 deaths of people with underlying conditions in the over 65 age group. Of the 107 deaths in the 25-64 age group, 98 had underlying conditions.

In terms of underlying conditions, chronic heart disease was present in 44% of deaths.

Outbreaks

There have been 13,431 positive Covid-19 cases linked to an outbreak, which is defined as two or more cases in the same location and time. Women account for 59% of all cases linked to an outbreak.

Almost a quarter (22%) of outbreaks affected those aged 80 years and older compared with 14% of all cases. The median age of confirmed cases related to an outbreak is 54.

Nursing homes accounted for 44% of all confirmed cases related to an outbreak. This has decreased from a peak of 47% in late April.

Hospitals, residential institutions and nursing homes account for nearly 60% of all cases linked to an outbreak. Cases linked to nursing homes have fallen every week since late April.

More than 40% of cases related to an outbreak in the last four weeks were linked to travel. July was also the first month where more than five cases were linked to outbreaks in restaurants or cafés.

For full statistics and tables, visit the CSO website.