Dan Dolan
- a tribute

When the Cashel GAA club formed a guard of honour at the removal of the remains of Dan Dolan to the church in Cashel on Sunday April 8th, they were paying tribute to a man whose outstanding qualities of honesty, dedication, commitment and loyalty to the task in hand, shone through every aspect of his life, and will continue to be an example to all who knew him and now mourn h

When the Cashel GAA club formed a guard of honour at the removal of the remains of Dan Dolan to the church in Cashel on Sunday April 8th, they were paying tribute to a man whose outstanding qualities of honesty, dedication, commitment and loyalty to the task in hand, shone through every aspect of his life, and will continue to be an example to all who knew him and now mourn h

is passing.

Born in Drumnee, Dan spent all his 86 years there and although his two brothers emigrated to England and Australia Dan was a Drumnee man first and foremost and remained staunchly committed to his native place throughout his long and healthy life.

There was always strong support in the townland of Drumnee for the GAA club and Dan, in the natural course of events, was no doubt inspired and motivated by the performances of his brothers Larry and PJ in games that Cashel played in the mid forties. When the club, under the guidance of Fr McLoughlin, reorganised itself for another onslaught on the Junior Championship in 1948, it was no surprise to find Dan in the vanguard of the group of young men who were destined to bring the Junior Championship back to Cashel for the second time, after a lapse of five years.

A longer lapse was to follow before Cashel would again feature in a Championship Final. During those leaner years, Dan remained dedicated to the club and to playing football, and when the AGM of 1961 came around it was Dan who was unanimously elected as Chairman.

It was a good choice, as Dan both by action and by word, encouraged the team to one victory after another in the league, but as everyone knows the Championship is a different ball game and when the extra spark, drive and spirit was necessary it was Dan who provided it and held his ground, especially in the drawn and replayed games against Carrickedmond.

No one will deny that his contribution both on the field and off the field in 1961 justified his jesting in later years to fellow players, and to anyone else who cared to listen: “Sure, ye’d have never won it only for me.”

Of course Dan had other interests outside of football. He was a very good and honest card player and few could get the better of him in a game of draughts. Through the years he was always regarded highly by his employers as a dedicated, honest and committed worker.

Dan is missed by his friends and neighbours and it can be truly said the world is a lesser place now that he is gone.

Ar dheis Dé go raibh a anam dilis.