Carrigallen

THE MONTH OF JANUARY RENOWNED FOR SEVERE WIND STORMS: The night of the “big wind” occurred on Sunday 6th January 1839 and because it caused more widespread damage in Ireland than any storm on record. This storm has become part of Irish history of its severeness and the damage it caused all over Ireland. Houses blown down ,families had to sleep out in barns if they came off safe. This was due to winds that reached 20 miles per hour. The only storm which came close to this also occurred in the,month of January. This was on the night of 11th January 1974 when terrible winds which reached 124 mph in a number of places which uprooted trees many falling on cars and houses which also disrupted electricity supplies to 150,000 homes but this storm was only light in comparison with the night of the ”big wind” on 5th Jan 1839 which gave no warning of what was to come. On the night there was a heavy fall of snow across the country. Strong winds and heavy winds followed by midnight.The winds reached hurricane force across the lands killing hundreds tearing down buildngs and frightening the entire population. It is estimated that up to 30 people lost their lives and a large number of homes in Ireland suffered damage including churches. Historic ruins of castles monuments in cemeteries were knocked down and broken. The west of Ireland was also badly hit. In Westport Co Mayo fifteen hundred trees were blown down (uprooted). Farmers were badly hit not only had they to contend with damage to their homes and outbuildings their animals were scattered by the storm. Stacks of corn and hay were also blown away leaving no fodder for their animals. All who survived this terrible storm were wiped out in 7 years later with the great Famine which followed. So the thing is we should not complain.

THE MONTH OF JANUARY RENOWNED FOR SEVERE WIND STORMS: The night of the “big wind” occurred on Sunday 6th January 1839 and because it caused more widespread damage in Ireland than any storm on record. This storm has become part of Irish history of its severeness and the damage it caused all over Ireland. Houses blown down ,families had to sleep out in barns if they came off safe. This was due to winds that reached 20 miles per hour. The only storm which came close to this also occurred in the,month of January. This was on the night of 11th January 1974 when terrible winds which reached 124 mph in a number of places which uprooted trees many falling on cars and houses which also disrupted electricity supplies to 150,000 homes but this storm was only light in comparison with the night of the ”big wind” on 5th Jan 1839 which gave no warning of what was to come. On the night there was a heavy fall of snow across the country. Strong winds and heavy winds followed by midnight.The winds reached hurricane force across the lands killing hundreds tearing down buildngs and frightening the entire population. It is estimated that up to 30 people lost their lives and a large number of homes in Ireland suffered damage including churches. Historic ruins of castles monuments in cemeteries were knocked down and broken. The west of Ireland was also badly hit. In Westport Co Mayo fifteen hundred trees were blown down (uprooted). Farmers were badly hit not only had they to contend with damage to their homes and outbuildings their animals were scattered by the storm. Stacks of corn and hay were also blown away leaving no fodder for their animals. All who survived this terrible storm were wiped out in 7 years later with the great Famine which followed. So the thing is we should not complain.

BALLINAMORE/BREFFNE INTO: Ballinamore /Breffne INTO branch c/o Saint Marys NS Drumlea Carrigallen Co Leitrim at our recent INTO branch meeting our branch members felt that it is important to make the local community aware of the discriminatory changes that were stealthily imposed in the recent budget. The consequent implications include 1 future erosion of school bus transport,2) change in pupil teacher ratio, 3 withdrawal of financial support to schools,4) withdrawal of educational support within schools,5 threatened closure of local schools. Rural Ireland is under threat and it is extremely important that all people interested in the welfare of our children and the future of our rural society attend a public meeting which will be held in the commercial hotel Ballinamore on Monday 30th January 2012 at 8pm. Invited speakers will further elaborate on the seriousness of these implications. These notes come from Eileen Gallagher chairperson Ballinamore/Breffne INTO to Carrigallen correspondent for Carrigallen notes.

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