The truth behind Cashel’s latest addition-Heber Donn

As statues go Newtowncashel’s Heber Donn creation has generated much debate locally.

As statues go Newtowncashel’s Heber Donn creation has generated much debate locally.

In truth, not much is known about the unperterbed looking creation that sits proudly in the cnetre of Newtowncashel village.

Depending on who you believe, the ancient kings of Ireland were the descendants of Spain’s King Milesius.

When his homeland suffered the effects of famine, which would last over two decades, Milesius, according to popular folklore, sent his uncle Ithe to identify potential new targets.

What Milesius hadn’t bargained on was Ithe’s arrival onto Irish shores would be greeted in such unsavoury terms, culminating in his murder at the hands of the pre-Christian Irish race-Tuatha Dé Danann.

Incensed by his uncle’s death, Milesius sent his eight sons with a view to a full blown invasion. During the course of their voyage, a devastating storm claimed five of the travelling party. One of Milesius’ grandsons, Heber Donn however survived.

The three remaining sons, Heremon, Heber and Amergin, together with Heber Donn, eventually landed in 1699BC.

In an attempt to gain revenge, the quartet killed the Danan Kings, resulting in Heber and Heremon dividing the island between them.

Naming the land ‘Scotia’ after their mother, substantial portions were also given to Heber Donn and Lughaide.