Bulldozing ‘may not be worst option’ at Sli Corglass estate

Cllr Luie McEntire (FF) pictured at Sli Corglass. Photo By Shelley Corcoran
The gloomy spectre left by Ireland’s Celtic Tiger years was hammered home last week as demolition work began on one of Longford’s unfinished estates.

The gloomy spectre left by Ireland’s Celtic Tiger years was hammered home last week as demolition work began on one of Longford’s unfinished estates.

‘Sli Corglass’, a development comprising around a dozen detached houses at Moyne, Co Longford, has long been regarded as being among the county’s worst affected residential estates.

Earlier this month, the Leader revealed council bosses had received up to €250,000 in state funding for the levelling of eight unoccupied units.

Last week, work on those plans commenced in earnest in what local representatives have given a warm, yet circumspect welcome to.

“I’m delighted work has started,” said Fianna Fáil Cllr Luie McEntire.

“As they (houses earmarked for demolition) were an eyesore and with the football complex (Pairc na nGael) and the Church nearby, I’m sure people would like to see it (estate) being brought up to a reasonable standard,” he said.

Members from the nearby Tidy Towns villages of Legga and Moyne were also anxious to see progress being made, he added.

Cllr McEntire, whose other profession is that of an auctioneer, implied the works, when complete, could attract significant interest from would-be house hunters.

“The position of the houses (at the lower end of the estate) aren’t great.

“It’s very overcrowded and I just feel if the ones up at the top end are properly done up and sold at a reasonable price there would be people interested in buying them,” he said.

The remaining units in Sli Corglass, meanwhile, will stay in the hands of the estate’s original developer.