Adams says Cardinal should “reflect” on position as political pressure mounts

Liam Cosgrove

Reporter:

Liam Cosgrove

Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams has become the latest political leader to call for the resignation of beleaguered Cardinal Sean Brady.

Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams has become the latest political leader to call for the resignation of beleaguered Cardinal Sean Brady.

Mr Adams last night joined Taoiseach Enda Kenny and Tanaiste, Eamon Gilmore by urging the Cardinal to consider his position.

Like his Fine Gael counterpart, Mr Adams stopped short of challenging Cardinal Brady to step aside from his duties, stressing the Primate should “reflect” on Tuesday evening’s BBC documentary.

“Speaking personally, I do think he should (consider his position), of course he should,” said a pensive sounding Mr Adams.

The Belfast-born politician made his remarks to the Leader last night (Thursday) following a public meeting in the Longford Arms Hotel over the European fiscal treaty.

In an unusual twist however, Mr Adams took a slightly more explicit approach when dealing with the controversy that has threatened to heap further embarrassment on an already pressurised Catholic Church.

Despite speaking publicly on the furore for the first time, Mr Adams questioned whether high profile politicians should even be commenting on the fallout.

“I believe in a separation of church from State; that is very important,” he said.

“I don’t think it is the job of a political leader to tell the Church how it should be running its affairs.”

Yesterday, Labour leader Eamon Gilmore said it was “inappropriate” for the Cardinal to remain on as the head of the Catholic Church in Ireland.

Mr Adams appeared more anxious to repeat the stance taken by his party colleague, Northern Ireland Deputy First Minister.

Referring to the BBC programme which contained fresh claims about Cardinal Brady’s role in clerical child abuse allegations over 30 years ago, Mr Adams said he was unsure if the cleric would remain on in his current capacity.

“I don’t know,” was his simple reply. “What I do know is that I am a Catholic and that he should certainly reflect on it. This is an issue that affects all citizens, not least the victims.”