14.1 percent of county’s population non-Irish nationals

5,477 non-Irish nationals were in residence in County Longford at the time of the 2011 Census, according to figures released by the Central Statistics Office last week. The study subsequently found that foreign nationals accounted for 14.1% of the population of the county.

5,477 non-Irish nationals were in residence in County Longford at the time of the 2011 Census, according to figures released by the Central Statistics Office last week. The study subsequently found that foreign nationals accounted for 14.1% of the population of the county.

The publication entitled ‘Profile 6 Migration and Diversity’, presents a profile of non-Irish nationals living in Ireland during the 26th national census which took place in April of last year. It was also discovered that Polish nationals make up the majority of non-Irish living in Longford, with 1,628 Poles living here at the time. This was followed by the UK with 1,155.

The census results show that of the 53,267 persons who arrived in Ireland in the year prior to April 2011, 342 were living in Co Longford. Of these, 240 or 70.2 per cent were non-Irish nationals. The county was also responsible for the second lowest amount of foreign nationals nationwide, with 5,477 living at Longford addresses, just ahead of Leitrim’s 3,703. Edgeworthstown had the highest proportion of residents who were not Irish of any town in the county.

Commenting on the findings, Deirdre Cullen, Senior Statistician at the CSO said: “Ireland has become an increasingly diverse society over the past decade and the different nationalities that make up the population of Ireland have an increasingly important impact on the economy and society.”

Across Ireland, there was a total of 544,357 non-Irish nationals living in Ireland in April 2011, representing 199 different nations. As with Longford, the Polish community made up the largest single group of residents, with 8,928 residing in the Republic marking them just ahead of the UK with 112,259.

Meanwhile, the growth in the number of non-Irish nationals has continued since 2006, albeit at a slower pace than earlier years. Total numbers increased by 124,624 over the five years to April 2011, which represents a rise of 30 per cent. Amongst European nationals living in Ireland in 2011, Polish was the most common language with 112,811 speakers, followed by Lithuanian, Russian, Romanian and Latvian.