Bord na Móna ruling could have implications for Longford plant

By News Reporter

Reporter:

By News Reporter

A High Court decision to overturn a planning permission for the continued operation of a Bord na Móna peat-powered plant near Edenderry in Co Offaly could have ramifications for its Mount Dillon site, near Lanesboro.

A High Court decision to overturn a planning permission for the continued operation of a Bord na Móna peat-powered plant near Edenderry in Co Offaly could have ramifications for its Mount Dillon site, near Lanesboro.

An Taisce this afternoon secured the order before Mr Justice Michael White following a ruling earlier this month over the environmental impact assessment carried out by An Bord Pleanala in relation to the plant at Clonbollogue.

A stay on the ruling will continue until April 2016. Earlier this month, Mr Justice White ruled that Bord Pleanala had given a very narrow assessment of the environmental impact of the continued operation of the plant.

Earlier today, he granted an application by James Devlin SC, for An Taisce, to quash the application.

He granted a stay on the order to April 30, 2016 while also listing the matter for mention on February 9, 2016.

The ruling however, could also impact Bord na Móna’s Mount Dillon site which is also peat powered and is due for renewal in 2019.

Local Fianna Fail TD Robert Troy said the decision had not only put a question mark over the 180 workers currently employed in Edenderry, but had also raised doubts about its other plants in the midlands.

“There are also serious concerns surrounding the future of other peat powered power plants and the extensive employment they provide in the midlands through peat harvesting operations,” said the Longford Westmeath TD.

“Bord na Móna is a significant employer in the region but this High Court ruling puts a question mark over the company’s future operations.”