Cashel boil water notice lifted

A happy and relieved Newtowncashel family: Pat McDonagh with his wife Natalie and their children Pat, Luke, and Ava delighted at the lifting of the boil-water notice. Photo: Declan Gilmore
Irish Water outdoor staff began knocking on doors telling home owners meters were being installed in Newtowncashel just hours after an eight month boil water notice was lifted.

Irish Water outdoor staff began knocking on doors telling home owners meters were being installed in Newtowncashel just hours after an eight month boil water notice was lifted.

Father of three, Pat McDonagh said a knock arrived at his door informing him of the move last week.

“My son was waiting two years for a hearing test and yet a guy from Irish Water came round within 12 hours of the boil water notice being lifted to say they (Irish Water) are putting in the meter.

“That’s efficiency for you.”

Despite telling of his relief at the boil water notice finally drawing to an end last Wednesday, Mr McDonagh said he was struck by the suddenness of it all.

“In fairness they (Irish Water) did a lot of work on the well and everything is back to normal now which is great.

“But if Irish Water was running the country it would be booming,” he joked.

“I’m surprised he didn’t turn up with the bill and say to me: ‘Here is your bill’.”

He also said the past eight months hadn’t come without its fair share of hardship.

Much of that, he said, was having to constantly guard against any of his three children from inadvertently drinking the prohibited water.

“Adults are fine, it’s the children that you have to concern yourself with,” he explained.

“I didn’t have any difficulty with buying bottled water. It wasn’t the cost, it was the lugging it home part and the disposing of the plastic bottles afterwards,” he said.

Fine Gael councillor Colm Murray confirmed last week that tthe boil water notice in Newtowncashel had finally been lifted and he welcomed the news.

He said the news had come as a “huge relief” to local residents and business owners.

“There was about 516 people affected, but it’s great these people can now get up in the morning and drink a glass a water without worrying about it,” he said.

Irish Water Regional Operations Manager Tom Leahy said once traces of cryptosporidium had been detected in the local water supply, swift and immediate action was taken.

“Works commenced in November 2014 and were completed in March 2015. “Once the solution was identified the works progressed quickly ensuring that normal water use could be achieved as soon as possible.

“Safe, clean drinking water is a right of all communities across Ireland,” he said.