Emma’s Wild Words

Emma Donohoe's poetry will be published in a new new anthology of short stories and poetry from teenage writers from all over Ireland and the United Kingdom.
The future is bright for 16 year old poet Emma Donohoe of Colehill, Longford, following the publication of her poetry in this year’s Wild Words anthology.

The future is bright for 16 year old poet Emma Donohoe of Colehill, Longford, following the publication of her poetry in this year’s Wild Words anthology.

The Wild Words Book is the central aspect of Carrick-on-Shannon’s Wild Words Children’s Book Festival, taking place this August. The book features a collection of short stories and poetry by young adults aged 14-18 from all over Ireland and the UK.

The book will be officially launched by Ray D’Arcy at the festival this Saturday August 8.. The successful scribes will also attend a free two-day writing masterclass with publishing manager Grainne Clear, author Anne Carey and journalist Aoife Barry - a place which is valued at €250.

“I personally just can’t wait for this wonderful opportunity, and I’m really looking forward to learning from the workshops,” enthuses Emma, who is a student of Mercy Secondary School in Ballymahon.

She explains that she found the competition while searching online. “I find that there’s not really many outlets for creative writing in the mainstream education of school”, she continues, referring to the inflexible and limited English curriculums for Junior and Leaving Certificate - which offer no support for budding poets and reward a formulaic approach to short-story writing.

The Wild Words Children’s Book Festival runs on Saturday and Sunday the 8th and 9th of August and features workshops and readings suitable for children aged 4 to 18.

A daughter of Annie and Paul from Ratharney, Emma is enthusiastic to raise support for this prestigious and worthwhile event.

“I want to encourage more people of my age to enter next year” she explains, acknowledging that this success is a springboard for her literary career.

Emma’s two submitted poems: ‘The Argosy’ and ‘Felling Fire’, are rich in dramatic imagery and allusion, dealing with the dynamic and powerful themes of a shipwreck and the felling of a burning tree.

Despite Emma’s modesty, her work suggests an impressive poetic flair which deserves to be fostered and allowed to flourish. Here’s hoping that this young poet continues to write and publish her work in the upcoming years. No pressure, Emma!